Route to Alhambra

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The Alhambra Route takes you to explore all of Granada on a sightseeing train tour through the most symbolic areas and monuments of the city with special attention to the architectural ensemble of the Alhambra. Con la Ruta a la Alhambra descubrirás la extensa y cultural historia de Granada, desde la época medieval hasta el reino nazarí y de la conquista cristiana a la modernidad. Granada te ofrece un sinfín de puntos de interés que visitar repartidos por los barrios del Albaicín, el Sacromonte y el Realejo. With Granada City Tour you will not miss any detail or monument of this magnificent city.

If you choose this tour route you will marvel at the splendid architecture of the Alhambra, the stately Palace of Charles V and its rectangular courtyard and the gardens of the Generalife. Además, Granada City Tour le llevará a los monumentos más simbólicos de la ciudad como la Catedral, el Mirador de San Nicolás y la Capilla Real donde podrá visitar la tumba de los Reyes Católicos. Create your own sightseeing itinerary and enjoy the Granada City Tour Hop-on Hop-off service to explore the city at your leisure. Hop on and off our tourist train as many times as you wish during the validity of your ticket to explore the most characteristic streets and neighborhoods of Granada.

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Alhambra Route

Discover the extensive and cultural history of Granada, from medieval times to modern times. Visit countless points of interest in the Albaicín, Sacromonte and Realejo neighborhoods and enjoy the magnificent views of the city thanks to the panoramic roof of the train.

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09:30 - 19:30
icon interval
30 - 45 min
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13 stops
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01:30 h

The Alhambra complex, containing the world's most spectacular Arabic citadel and the symbol of Granada, consists of different tourist areas. Inside the Alhambra complex you can visit the Alcazaba, the heart of the fortress used for surveillance; the Palace of Charles V, a Christian structure that also houses the Fine Arts Museum; the Generalife, a place of gardens and relaxation; and the Nasrid Palaces, heart of the Alhambra and seat of the sultans. Be sure to visit the Carmen de los Mártires, one of Granada's most romantic gardens.

The Alhambra complex, containing the world's most spectacular Arabic citadel and the symbol of Granada, consists of different tourist areas. Inside the Alhambra complex you can visit the Alcazaba, the heart of the fortress used for surveillance; the Palace of Charles V, a Christian structure that also houses the Fine Arts Museum; the Generalife, a place of gardens and relaxation; and the Nasrid Palaces, heart of the Alhambra and seat of the sultans. Be sure to visit the Carmen de los Mártires, one of Granada's most romantic gardens.

Cuesta de Gomérez is one of the emblematic streets of Granada from where you can access the Alhambra and its palace complex. The Puerta de las Granadas (Gate of the Pomegranates) is the first monument you will find on your way, it marks the start of the Alhambra walks. However, if you go towards the center of Granada, from Cuesta de Gomérez, you will be very close to Bañuelo and Torres Bermejas. At Bañuelo, you can admire the aesthetics of the Arab baths built in the 11th century, while at Torres Bermejas, you can verify the effectiveness of the defense of this 9th century military fortress.

Plaza Nueva is one of Granada's busiest squares and is surrounded by hotels, restaurants and shops. From the Plaza Nueva in Granada you can walk up to the Alhambra or sit at one of its terraces before visiting Granada's important sightseeing spots like the Royal Chancery, the Casa de los Tiros Museum and the Church of San Gil and Santa Ana. The Royal Chancery was built on the order of the Catholic Monarchs when they transferred the court to Granada. The façade of the Royal Chancery is a fine example of Spanish Renaissance style.

The Paseo de los Tristes offers breathtaking views of the Alhambra. Although its official name is Paseo del Padre Manjón, it's called Paseo de los Tristes for the funeral processions that passed through here en route to the cemetery. Worth seeing on the Paseo de los Tristes is the Renaissance Church of Saints Peter and Paul, with sculptures by Pedro de Mena. A walk around the Paseo de los Tristes will take you to the Casa Castril, one of Granada's most renowned landmarks thanks to its rectangular patio and the garden at its rear.

Also in the Albaicín neighbourhood is the Plaza de San Miguel Bajo, noted for housing the Church of San Miguel Bajo. This church retains its historical value since it was once one of the most populated parishes in Albaicín. Its Mudéjar style is evident in the two roof segments covering the single nave. While walking through the Plaza de San Miguel Bajo, be sure to see the 15th century Dar Al-Horra Palace, the last residence of the mother of Mohammed XII of Granada. A few steps away you can visit the Convent of Santa Isabel la Real.

La Cartuja de Granada is a Carthusian monastery in Granada, Spain. It is one of the finest examples of Spanish Baroque architecture. The charterhouse was founded in 1506; construction started ten years later, and continued for the following 300 years. While the exterior is a tame ember in comparison, the interior of the monastery's is a flamboyant explosion of ornamentation. Its complex echoing geometric surfaces make of it one of the masterpieces of Churrigueresque style.

The Monumental de Frascuelo is the third bullring of the city of Granada. It was built in 1928, in the golden age of bullfighting. The man behind its construction was the bullfighter Lagartijillo Chico, and his fondness for his teacher Frascuelo gave the ring its nickname, the Monumental de Frascuelo. The first bullfight was held here on 30th September 1928.

The Plaza de la Romanilla is one of the most centrally located urban spaces and is near the Granada cathedral. This plaza, known also as Plaza de las Palmeras due to the presence of palm trees, is next to the cathedral and the royal chapel. Isabella I of Castile ordered the cathedral of Granada built after the city was conquered in 1492. Inside the cathedral, in the Royal Chapel, you can visit the tomb of the Catholic Monarchs. The Royal Chapel has a single exterior wall, its other three sides being shared with the Cathedral, the Lonja de Mercaderes (marketplace) and the Sagrario (Sanctuary).

Alhóndiga Street gets its name from the many stands where products were bought and sold in old Granada. In Medieval times this area was known for its prominent status in the silk market. Alhóndiga Street now is the nerve centre for trade in Granada. A few minutes away on foot is the Church of la Magdalena, a prime example of Grenadine Baroque architecture. This religious building is attributed to Alonso Cano. From the Church of la Magdalena you can get to the Aljibe de San Miguel, a pointed horseshoe arch atop Roman columns that supplied water to part of Granada's residents.

The Plaza de Mariana Pineda renders homage to the local heroine who died in defence of freedom during the dictatorial reign of Fernando VII. In this square you can see the statue to Mariana Pineda, a monument known as the "Heroine of Freedom". Behind the Plaza de Mariana Pineda you'll find the Bibataubín Palace, a building constructed by the Bourbons atop the Arabic gate of Bibataubín. A pleasant walk will take you to the Basilica de Nuestra Señora de las Angustias (Our Lady of Sorrows), which houses an image of the Virgin of Sorrows, the patron saint of Granada.

The Realejo of Granada was the old Jewish neighbourhood of Muslim Granada. According to many historians, the name of the city of Granada comes from Realejo .Realejo is now a heavily populated neighbourhood, and its streets are vibrant with a distinctive character.

The Hotel Alhambra Palace, Granada's premier luxury hotel, is located very close to the Alhambra. On the last stop in the Granada City Tour you'll discover various must-see spots in Granada like the Carmen de los Mártires gardens and the Manuel de Falla Home and Museum. One of Granada's most beautiful gardens, Carmen de los Mártires dates from the 19th century and features a small palace and spacious gardens. South of the Carmen de los Mártires is the Manuel de Falla Home and Museum, which was once home to the Andalusian musician.