Featured monuments

Granada

 

Discover the top Granada attractions. Don't miss the best places to visit in the city.

Alhambra

Alhambra

The Alhambra, declared a World Heritage Site in 1984, is a palatial city near the Darro River. Its name comes from the colour of its walls (Al-Hamra in Arabic) which were made using the clay found locally, and the reddish tint this gave the bricks. The Alhambra is an unparalleled example of how light and water can make significant decorative effects on the architecture. A careful selection of materials means that this decorative effect changes with the varying patterns of light.

How to get to: Alhambra

Basílica de San Juan de Dios

Basílica de San Juan de Dios

The Baroque Basílica de San Juan de Dios dates from the 18th century. It has a beautiful Baroque front framed by towers with slate capitals. The Basílica de San Juan de Dios is formed by two bodies with sculptures and reliefs and divided into three lanes by Corinthian columns. Most notable in its inner part is the altarpiece of the Main Altar. In the niche, a silver urn keeps the remains of San Juan de Dios (Saint John of God). From the Basílica de San Juan de Dios you will be able to visit the Aljibe de San Miguel and Monasterio de San Jerónimo.

How to get to: Basílica de San Juan de Dios

Carmen de los Mártires

Carmen de los Mártires

According to tradition, Carmen de los Mártires was built on the site of the former dungeons of the captive Christians in Nasrid times. Once the city was conquered by the Christians, it became a Carmelite convent with San Juan de la Cruz as prior for several years. Its aspect today is XIX Century, as can be seen from the orientalist trend of the moment. The gardens are a subtle blend of French and English models with the beauty of the Nasrid gardens.

How to get to: Carmen de los Mártires

Carrera del Darro

Carrera del Darro

The Carrera del Darro is one of Granada's most scenic walks. On the Darro river's right bank, it is crossed by two brick and stone bridges (the Cabrera and Espinosa bridges). Source: www.granadadirect.com

How to get to: Carrera del Darro

Catedral

Catedral de Sevilla

The Cathedral of Granada is considered as the first Renaissance church of Spain and as one of the best examples of this movement. The Catholic Monarchs were the founders in 1492, and it was at first meant to copy the Gothic model of the Cathedral in Toledo. Nearly two hundred years later, in 1704, the work was finished. The main façade is a masterpiece of Baroque art by Alonso Cano in 1667.

How to get to: Catedral

Generalife

Generalife

The Generalife is located on the hill Cerro del Sol, adjacent to the Alhambra. Its name means 'garden of the architect'. Originally it was most probably an architect's house that later passed to the Arab kings and was remodelled. The Generalife is composed of a series of large gardens, where every corner holds a novelty and a pleasant surprise for the eyes, with a minimum of obtrusive buildings.

How to get to: Generalife

Mirador de San Nicolás

Mirador de San Nicolás

This small plaza in the Albaicín neighbourhood, near the Church of San Nicolás, thought to be the oldest in the area, offers one of the best views of the Alhambra, the Vega de Granada and the Sierra Nevada. Source: www.artehistoria.com

How to get to: Mirador de San Nicolás

Monasterio de San Jerónimo

Monasterio de San Jerónimo

The Monasterio de San Jerónimo was built by El Florentino, El Indiano and Diego de Siloé. The altarpiece is a wonderful piece. Its layout conforms a single nave Latin cross, covered by a Gothic fan vaulting with side chapels and the most notable octagonal apse which the magnificent altarpiece fits to. The convent owns several cloisters. The first of them is Gothic, with basket-handle archs, fantasy images capitals and beautiful Plateresque fronts, works of Siloé and his school. The second one conformed in an early Renaissance style and its dimensions are smaller.

How to get to: Monasterio de San Jerónimo

Paseo de los Tristes

Paseo de los Tristes

Paseo de los Tristes is the point of encounter for the people of Granada, this square beside the River Darro takes its curious name from the funeral processions which used to pass through it before winding their way up to the cemetery. Also named the Paseo del Padre Manjón (Boulevard of Father Manjón) in honour of the monk who founded a school for poor children in Sacromonte, one of its main attractions is the magnificent view of the sun going down behind the Alhambra.

How to get to: Paseo de los Tristes

Torres Bermejas

Torres Bermejas

Torres Bermejas is a military fortress set on the Mauror hill, built on the site of former simpler constructions. The defence tower stood separately from the Alhambra, until the XIV Century, when it was connected by means of an encircling wall. The towers give a spectacular view of the city to the south and the Alcazaba Fortress to the north, and they form part of the defence system of the old Jewish quarter.

How to get to: Torres Bermejas